All Blog Posts about ‘Rotary Kilns’

Question of the Week: What is Sintering?

This article was authored by:

Jenny Seim
Technical Writer

Sintering is the process of heating a material to a point just before melting via a rotary kiln. The objective here is to use the high internal temperature of the rotary kiln to increase the strength of the material. The most common use of this Continue reading →

 

Question of the Week: In Relation to Indirect Rotary Kilns, What is the Cross-Flow Configuration?

This article was authored by:

Jenny Seim
Technical Writer

An important consideration in rotary kiln design is air flow, or the direction in which the process gas moves through the kiln in relation to the material. The cross-flow configuration is specific to indirect-fired rotary kilns. Here, the material and the process gas flow perpendicular Continue reading →

 

Question of the Week: What are the Differences Between FEECO’s Drive Assemblies?

This article was authored by:

Jenny Seim
Technical Writer

FEECO offers a variety of options in drive assemblies for your rotary dryer, cooler, kiln, or granulation drum, all selected based on the requirements of the application. Chain and Sprocket Drive Assembly Chain and sprocket drive assemblies are ideal for smaller drums running up to Continue reading →

 

Biochar in Drought Resistance

This article was co-authored by:

Walter Hawkins
Process Sales Engineer

Carrie Carlson
Technical Writer

Drought is becoming a rising concern across the world as water scarcity, changing climate patterns, and the need to feed a growing population continue to dominate the landscape of pressing global issues. As such, the need for soils to be capable of withstanding drought conditions Continue reading →

 

Biochar Process & Product Development in the Innovation Center

This article was co-authored by:

Walter Hawkins
Process Sales Engineer

Carrie Carlson
Technical Writer

Biochar is continuing to make a name for itself in a myriad of industries, with new applications making headlines all the time. Uses in water treatment, energy production, animal husbandry, and more have created a flurry of activity around this carbon-based material produced from biomass. Continue reading →

 

Question of the Week: What is Reduction Roasting?

This article was authored by:

Jenny Seim
Technical Writer

Reduction roasting is the removal of oxygen from a component of an ore, usually through the use of Carbon Monoxide (CO). The CO is typically supplied by mixing a carbonaceous material such as coke or coal with the ore, or by feeding it separately. An Continue reading →

 

Fly Ash & the Lightweight Aggregate Market

This article was co-authored by:

Shane Le Capitaine
Thermal Processing Expert

Carrie Carlson
Technical Writer

In 2015, the global fly ash market was estimated to be valued at 40 billion USD. A recent industry analysis by Research Nester anticipates the market will reach an estimated 70 billion USD by the end of 2023 – a 7.1% CAGR owing to increasing Continue reading →

 

Question of the Week: What is the Difference Between a Rotary Kiln’s Working Layer and Insulating Layer?

This article was authored by:

Jenny Seim
Technical Writer

The “working” layer and insulating layer refer to a rotary kiln’s multiple layers of refractory. Refractory is what protects the kiln from high internal temperatures, and maintains heat retention. Sometimes it is desirable to use multiple layers of refractory, especially when higher efficiency is preferred, Continue reading →

 

Question of the Week: What Fuel Sources can FEECO’s Rotary Dryers and Kilns Work With?

This article was authored by:

Jenny Seim
Technical Writer

FEECO’s rotary dryers and kilns can accommodate numerous fuel sources. The chart below highlights the equipment and their available fuel source options: Natural Gas/Propane Fuel Oil Electricity Biomass Combustion Waste Heat Biogas Direct Rotary Dryer  x  x  x  x x Indirect Rotary Dryer  x  x Continue reading →

 

Question of the Week: How does a Rotary Kiln Dam Work?

This article was authored by:

Jenny Seim
Technical Writer

Dams are used to increase the retention time or bed depth in a rotary kiln. Material builds up behind the dam, forcing retention time and bed depth to increase. Material then spills over the dam and discharges from the rotary kiln. Since most rotary kilns Continue reading →