All Blog Posts about ‘Chemical Processing’

Processing Phosphates for Use in Animal Feed

This article was co-authored by:

Carrie Carlson
Technical Writer

Shane Le Capitaine
Thermal Processing Expert

High Speed Mixer for Phosphate Animal Feed Granulation

Phosphorus is an essential component in the makeup of life on Earth. Not only is it a building block in growing healthy, strong plants, but it is also an important building block for humans and animals as well; most notably, phosphorus aids in a variety Continue reading →

 

Conversion to Fuel via Pyrolysis Could be the Answer to the Plastics Plague

This article was co-authored by:

Process and Sales Engineer
Thermal Processing Expert

Carrie Carlson
Technical Writer

Plastic-to-Fuel Conversion via Plastic Pyrolysis Could be the Answer to the Plastics Plague

While plastic has improved our lives in innumerable many ways, it has also become an insurmountable waste management issue, threatening the environment around us. As the world demands change, many industry experts are looking to plastic pyrolysis, a form of advanced plastics recycling and recovery Continue reading →

 

Potassium Sulfate (SOP): A High-Value Alternative to Potassium Chloride (MOP)

This article was co-authored by:

Chris Kozicki
Agglomeration Expert

Carrie Carlson
Technical Writer

Potassium Sulfate (Sulphate) Granules

A booming population, combined with many other factors, has put market traction around potassium sulfate (K2SO4) in recent years. Data Bridge Market Research estimates that the potassium sulfate market will exhibit a CAGR of 5.5% between 2017 to 2024, landing at 10,535.84 thousand tons by Continue reading →

 

Rotary Kiln Gains Traction as E-Waste Crisis Looms

This article was co-authored by:

Process and Sales Engineer
Thermal Processing Expert

Carrie Carlson
Technical Writer

Rotary Kiln Gains Traction as E-Waste Crisis Looms, Metal Recovery from E-Waste

Electronic waste, or e-waste, is continuing to capture global attention thanks to a litany of issues associated with the waste, ranging from environmental hazards to humanitarian concerns. As growing amounts of the waste add to fears of a looming crisis, efforts to recover valuable materials Continue reading →

 

Spodumene Makes A Comeback in the Rush for Lithium

This article was co-authored by:

Process and Sales Engineer
Thermal Processing Expert

Carrie Carlson
Technical Writer

Lithium from Spodumene

The electric vehicle and battery markets are calling for unprecedented amounts of lithium; in 2016, demand for the lightweight metal rose by 26%, and is predicted to climb an additional 39% in 2018. By 2025, experts anticipate demand is likely to increase by a staggering Continue reading →

 

Rotary Kiln Testing in the Innovation Center

This article was co-authored by:

Process and Sales Engineer
Thermal Processing Expert

Carrie Carlson
Technical Writer

Rotary Kiln Feasibility Testing

Rotary kilns use extremely high temperatures in order to cause chemical reactions or phase changes in material. They are frequently used in the production of the materials all around us, particularly when it comes to advanced materials such as catalysts and absorbents, which require precision Continue reading →

 

R&D Around Catalyst Production Sees Growth

This article was co-authored by:

Process and Sales Engineer
Thermal Processing Expert

Carrie Carlson
Technical Writer

Catalyst Production Research and Development on the Rise

Catalysts are an invaluable tool in many industrial processes, helping to facilitate reactions between materials. They are so important in fact, that some experts estimate they are responsible for 85-90% of products in the chemical industry.¹ As the role of catalysts in industry continues to Continue reading →

 

Photo of the Week: Micro-pelletized Paint Pigment Sample

This article was authored by:

Jenny Seim
Technical Writer

Micropellets

This week’s photo highlights a micro-pelletized paint pigment sample from FEECO’s Innovation Center. Micro-pelletizing is the practice of agglomerating material fines into small pellets. Unlike traditional pelletizing, this process produces a smaller end-product- typically pellets between 20 to 60 mesh. It is most commonly used Continue reading →

 


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