All Blog Posts about ‘Question of the Week’

Question of the Week: What Causes Refractory Failure in a Rotary Kiln?

This article was authored by:

Jenny Seim
Technical Writer

Cycling and chemical incompatibility are the two main causes of refractory failure in a rotary kiln. Cycling Cycling is the heating up and cooling down of a rotary kiln, and it is the largest source of refractory failure. Refractory expands with the kiln as it Continue reading →

 

Question of the Week: What Materials are Commonly Agglomerated?

This article was authored by:

Jenny Seim
Technical Writer

The use of agglomeration to solve material problems and improve material characteristics has made its way into numerous industries around the globe, with new applications continually on the rise. A list of industries, and some of the materials commonly agglomerated in them, include: Ag Chemicals Continue reading →

 

Question of the Week: What is Micro-Pelletizing?

This article was authored by:

Jenny Seim
Technical Writer

Micro-pelletizing is the process of agglomerating material fines into small pellets. This differs from traditional pelletizing, in that it produces much smaller pellets, typically around 20-60 mesh. Pin mixers are the equipment of choice when it comes to micro-pelletizing; they can be used as a Continue reading →

 

Question of the Week: How Can a Pipe Reactor Benefit your Process?

This article was authored by:

Jenny Seim
Technical Writer

A pipe reactor is an acid-base reaction vessel that can be incorporated into an agglomeration drum for the production of various, inorganic fertilizers. While the pipe reactor is not required in a system, it can add immense value to a process in terms of energy Continue reading →

 

Photo of the Week: Washboarding on a Rotary Drum Tire

This article was authored by:

Jenny Seim
Technical Writer

This week’s photo highlights washboarding on a rotary drum tire. Washboarding is indicated by the vertical grooves that extend the length of the tire, and it is caused by abnormal skewing of the trunnion wheels, or trunnion wheel mis-alignment. FEECO offers a tire grinding service Continue reading →

 

Question of the Week: How do Leaf Seals Work?

This article was authored by:

Jenny Seim
Technical Writer

FEECO’s leaf seals are designed to minimize air leakage into a rotary dryer or rotary kiln. We offer both single and double leaf seals. The single leaf seal consists of a series of overlapping spring steel plates that are mounted to the housing and ride Continue reading →

 

Question of the Week: What is a Rotary Kiln Bed Disturber?

This article was authored by:

Jenny Seim
Technical Writer

Bed disturbers are used in both direct and indirect-fired rotary kilns to promote uniform heating of the material. The bed of material should roll, not slide, throughout the kiln in order to expose fresh material to the process. This rolling action allows for even heat Continue reading →

 

Question of the Week: How Does a Pug Mill Work?

This article was authored by:

Jenny Seim
Technical Writer

Pug mills, also known as paddle mixers, are industrial mixing devices capable of conditioning, agglomerating, and mixing. Pug mills use dual counter-rotating shafts with affixed pitched paddles to create a kneading and folding over motion inside of the mixer. The counter-rotating motion lifts material up Continue reading →

 

Question of the Week: What Components does a Rotary Dryer Consist of?

This article was authored by:

Jenny Seim
Technical Writer

While rotary dryers should be customized to yield optimal processing conditions around the material and drying needs at hand, the basis of a rotary dryer is often somewhat standard. The following is an overview of some of the standard components of a rotary dryer, as Continue reading →

 

Question of the Week: What is Sintering?

This article was authored by:

Jenny Seim
Technical Writer

Sintering is the process of heating a material to a point just before melting via a rotary kiln. The objective here is to use the high internal temperature of the rotary kiln to increase the strength of the material. The most common use of this Continue reading →